Undecidedly So

I don't need any more distractions, but give them to me anyways.   Yeahhhh, show me some stuff.   A 23 year old queer, Pinay feminist with a bachelor's in Studio Art and flaws out the wazoo. If I see bullshit, I will try to wipe it with my toilet paper of social justice advocacy and flush with the downward force of posted links to answers that you could probably learn more about yourself. Before and after, I will attempt to dissipate any lingering smells by lighting the matches of entertainment in the form of longboarding stuff and people being awesome and terrible puns and artful photos of funny reptiles and things of this nature. Often I sleep too much and not enough. Call me out on my own bullshit, because I still have a lot to learn. Sometimes spams fandoms.
Be prepared for occasional porn.

twitter.com/pawikan303:

    whatwhiteswillneverknow:

    FBI Uniform Crime Report Hate Crime Statistics, 2011

    (Source: fbi.gov, via wtfwhiteppl)

    — 17 hours ago with 3752 notes
    soloontherocks:

luxtempestas:

OKAY SO MY MOM REALLY LOVES OLAF HES LIKE HER FAVOURITE FICTIONAL CHARACTER NOW AND IT SNOWED SOME GOOD PACKING SNOW TODAY AND SHE ASKED IF I WANTED TO BUILD HIM ONCE WE SHOVELED SO WE FUCKIGN DID.
the prince is awake
your shit is wrecked.

do you want to build a motherfucking snowman

    soloontherocks:

    luxtempestas:

    OKAY SO MY MOM REALLY LOVES OLAF HES LIKE HER FAVOURITE FICTIONAL CHARACTER NOW AND IT SNOWED SOME GOOD PACKING SNOW TODAY AND SHE ASKED IF I WANTED TO BUILD HIM ONCE WE SHOVELED SO WE FUCKIGN DID.

    the prince is awake

    your shit is wrecked.

    do you want to build a motherfucking snowman

    (via nipple-whisperer)

    — 17 hours ago with 139912 notes

    cookiecest:

    miss-andrea:

    say it with me now kids

    racism is natural

    racism is healthy

    racism is nothing to be ashamed of

    image

    (via nipple-whisperer)

    — 17 hours ago with 59479 notes

    kingxanxus:

    do you ever drop something and instead of picking it back up you just stare at on the ground and think about what a failure you are

    (via nipple-whisperer)

    — 17 hours ago with 229243 notes

    screwsociety:

    you know girls can tell when you look at their boobs

    i don’t care how quickly you glance, 1 second is like 5 seconds in boob time

    (via nipple-whisperer)

    — 17 hours ago with 423375 notes
    "

    1. Waiting for the ‘right’ moment

    How many times have you said, “I’m just going to wait until I have enough money saved up,” or “I need to research more.” As the Chinese proverb goes, “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.”

    Stop waiting for the unicorn and take the bull by the horns now. Any action is better than no action.


    2. The approval of others

    While it is important to receive validation for your work, constantly seeking that pat on the back from others will get you nowhere. Do not feed into the ego of your ever-needy self-esteem. It is nice to receive good comments on your work. But do not mix up what is good for the ego for what is good for your productivity.


    3. The need to always be perfect

    Perfectionism is crippling. By all means strive for excellence and seek to produce the best product you are able to deliver. But spending far too much time on any task can become detrimental when you have people waiting for you to deliver. If your work meets their expectations, then drop the product. If you exceed it, even better. But do not keep them waiting too long. You could spend an eternity improving a product.


    4. Giving too much respect

    Even Einstein made mistakes. Just because someone is in a prominent position, it does not mean they have all the answers. This habit cripples many people who listen to ‘respectable’ figures who are in a completely different field to them.

    How many times have you seen an actor endorsing a product they know nothing about and people listening just because they are famous? Terrible habit.


    5. Germophobia

    It should not only be great leaders that aren’t afraid of getting their hands dirty, but anyone striving after success. Getting your hands dirty means engaging in a task that is outside of your responsibility.

    Win the respect of others by doing something beyond your duty.


    6. Not learning from people ‘less’ than you

    Pride is like putting poison into your own glass of water. Great knowledge can come from anyone. But if you simply shut someone off because they do not have a PhD or they are not a CEO, you are potentially robbing yourself of a golden nugget. You never know what kind of experience a person has or who the person may be connected with.


    7. Rushing the last look

    You are so excited with finishing your work that you just want to ship it straight out the door without giving it a final once-over. This is the Achilles Heel for most writers. But what separates a good writer from an average writer is patience- many writers will let an article sit overnight and then make more edits in the morning before sending it. This applies for other industries also, take time to give it one last thorough check. Even get someone else to have a look before you ship or hit the send button.


    8. Not being vulnerable

    It is easy to feel the need to put on a mask in your career, particularly if you are in leadership. No doubt there is a clear line that needs to be drawn between employers and employees. But you need to take off the iron suit every now and then.

    Admit to making mistakes, make apologies when you are in the wrong. You will be respected.


    9. Too stubborn to let go

    While grit, tenacity, and perseverance are all great qualities, they can be crippling when they are directed toward the wrong goal. This is difficult with any project that you have poured your heart and soul into. But if it is not profitable nor bringing you closer to your goal, then you need to recognize when you are being stubborn and let go. Treat any humiliation like water off a duck’s back and direct your energy toward the next project.


    10. The contentment plateau

    There is a dark side to being satisfied with your work and accomplishments. Being content and comfortable is the enemy of improvement. Take time during your journey to stop and smell the roses, but do not let be left standing there when the roses are long gone.

    Keep setting the bar higher. Knock down a goal, celebrate it, move on.

    "

    Author: Thai Nguyen - Site

    (via live-to-listen)

    (Source: thegoodvibe.co, via recovery-burrito)

    — 20 hours ago with 4953 notes

    hawkules:

    who needs a rogue when you can have alistair deactivate every trap by triggering them

    (via dangercupcakemurdericing)

    — 20 hours ago with 4165 notes
    feministdisney:

fatgirlscanrockit:

thisisthinprivilege:

writeswrongs:

satelliteshowers:

fattyforever:

curvily:

How often have you been shopping and you come across something that is just PERFECT, but does not go up to your size? Over 60% of American women wear a size 14 or above, but only 17% of clothing sold is 14 & up. That is a ridiculous disparity.
Moreover, when some brands move into plus (ahem H&M), they throw their signature trendy looks by the wayside in favor of flowy dark fabrics that they think “work” for plus sizes. That is crap. Plus size women want color, print, and structure. Moreover, we want variety. A group this numerous cannot be a monolith, and since style is such a personal thing, we all have different tastes. I want #plussizeplease to be a way to showcase the demand for styles we’d buy and rock, and all the money brands are forfeiting by refusing to expand their sizes.
So here’s how to use it:
1) Snap a picture of a garment you love but does not come in your size. Include the brand and price, tagging the company if possible. For example, I am in love with this Zara marble print dress. I would have purchased it yesterday if it went above a size L. My tweet would be:
“.@Zara marble print sheath, $59. I’d buy it right now if it came in my size. #plussizeplease”
2) Use it on any social media – Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest… even Facebook supports hashtags now.
3) Tag anything you’d purchase, whether in store or online.
4) Feel free to include the size range it comes in and/or the size you think you’d need. Sizing can be tricky, so this is definitely not required.
5) Tell your friends! I don’t just want this to be a blogger thing – I want all women who wear size 14 and up to show their purchasing power and share styles they love. Let’s be unignorable!

Um, yes. I will be doing this.

Yes. I support this movement

watch me be loud as hell

Activism! #plussizeplease

Oh i WILL be doing this.

I LOVE and support this idea so much.

such support, much yes

    feministdisney:

    fatgirlscanrockit:

    thisisthinprivilege:

    writeswrongs:

    satelliteshowers:

    fattyforever:

    curvily:

    How often have you been shopping and you come across something that is just PERFECT, but does not go up to your size? Over 60% of American women wear a size 14 or above, but only 17% of clothing sold is 14 & up. That is a ridiculous disparity.

    Moreover, when some brands move into plus (ahem H&M), they throw their signature trendy looks by the wayside in favor of flowy dark fabrics that they think “work” for plus sizes. That is crap. Plus size women want color, print, and structure. Moreover, we want variety. A group this numerous cannot be a monolith, and since style is such a personal thing, we all have different tastes. I want #plussizeplease to be a way to showcase the demand for styles we’d buy and rock, and all the money brands are forfeiting by refusing to expand their sizes.

    So here’s how to use it:

    1) Snap a picture of a garment you love but does not come in your size. Include the brand and price, tagging the company if possible. For example, I am in love with this Zara marble print dress. I would have purchased it yesterday if it went above a size L. My tweet would be:

    “.@Zara marble print sheath, $59. I’d buy it right now if it came in my size. #plussizeplease”

    2) Use it on any social media – Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest… even Facebook supports hashtags now.

    3) Tag anything you’d purchase, whether in store or online.

    4) Feel free to include the size range it comes in and/or the size you think you’d need. Sizing can be tricky, so this is definitely not required.

    5) Tell your friends! I don’t just want this to be a blogger thing – I want all women who wear size 14 and up to show their purchasing power and share styles they love. Let’s be unignorable!

    Um, yes. I will be doing this.

    Yes. I support this movement

    watch me be loud as hell

    Activism! #plussizeplease

    Oh i WILL be doing this.

    I LOVE and support this idea so much.

    such support, much yes

    — 20 hours ago with 11089 notes
    #plussizeplease